Two car thefts in three months for Billericay family

Basildon Recorder: Mr Irvin's stolen Ford Focus Mr Irvin's stolen Ford Focus

A MAN feels unsafe in his own home after burglars broke in and stole two new cars off his driveway.

Chris Irvin, 24, bought a brand new Ford Focus ST after saving for more than three years with his brother Nick, 22. Just two days later, his family home, in Lancer Way, Billericay was broken into and the keys were stolen to his new £21,000 car before it was stolen.

This is the not the first time the Irvin family has seen a car nabbed from outside their home as Chris’s dad’s new £50,000 Audi S5 was taken on Tuesday, October 1. The car was later found burnt out in Cambridgeshire.

Mr Irvin said: “It has been a really difficult time for all of us. If you can’t feel safe in your own house where can you feel safe? Our front door wasn’t double locked when the cars were stolen but we didn’t think that would be a problem again.

“I was sitting downstairs with a friend and the next minute I heard a noise outside. When I looked outside I saw someone in a balaclava sitting behind the wheel. Then they sped off.

“To know people have been breaking into your house once, let alone twice, is really worrying. We had been saving up for a long time so to see all that suddenly dissapear is something you can’t put into words.”

Mr Irvin said he was not planning on getting a new car as the search for his Ford Focus continued as a vehicle isn’t vital to his computer design business.

He said he wanted to warn residents their cars may be in danger and police are appleaing for any witnesses to the crime or anyone with information to contact Basildon police on 101.

Comments (9)

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9:56am Sun 12 Jan 14

Russ13 says...

The front door wasn't double locked on both occasions???? Seriously!!!

Now I'm not saying Irvin deserves this to happen to him but quite frankly if you've had one car stolen where thieves have gained access via a door that wasn't properly secured surely you'd make sure the door was properly locked after?

The police say "Don't give them an easy ride", by not securing your property properly you may as well leave the keys in the ignition!

I know insurance companies have stopped paying out if the keys have been stolen without forcing entry to the house i.e. "fished" out via the letterbox where they've been left in view/reach of the front door under the reason you must take reasonable precautions to secure the vehicle and the vehicle's keys. I'm pretty sure it could be argued that not double locking the front door isn't taking reasonable precautions, especially the second time it happened!
The front door wasn't double locked on both occasions???? Seriously!!! Now I'm not saying Irvin deserves this to happen to him but quite frankly if you've had one car stolen where thieves have gained access via a door that wasn't properly secured surely you'd make sure the door was properly locked after? The police say "Don't give them an easy ride", by not securing your property properly you may as well leave the keys in the ignition! I know insurance companies have stopped paying out if the keys have been stolen without forcing entry to the house i.e. "fished" out via the letterbox where they've been left in view/reach of the front door under the reason you must take reasonable precautions to secure the vehicle and the vehicle's keys. I'm pretty sure it could be argued that not double locking the front door isn't taking reasonable precautions, especially the second time it happened! Russ13
  • Score: 8

10:48am Sun 12 Jan 14

Jack222 says...

Did the car fir into the garage?
Did the car fir into the garage? Jack222
  • Score: -3

1:04pm Sun 12 Jan 14

The Macduffian says...

Russ13 wrote:
The front door wasn't double locked on both occasions???? Seriously!!!

Now I'm not saying Irvin deserves this to happen to him but quite frankly if you've had one car stolen where thieves have gained access via a door that wasn't properly secured surely you'd make sure the door was properly locked after?

The police say "Don't give them an easy ride", by not securing your property properly you may as well leave the keys in the ignition!

I know insurance companies have stopped paying out if the keys have been stolen without forcing entry to the house i.e. "fished" out via the letterbox where they've been left in view/reach of the front door under the reason you must take reasonable precautions to secure the vehicle and the vehicle's keys. I'm pretty sure it could be argued that not double locking the front door isn't taking reasonable precautions, especially the second time it happened!
Hang on a minute, l might be old and naïve, but if you are downstairs in your own property, why should you double lock your doors, think of a fire escape with the doors double locked.

Anyway up here we go out and leave our doors unlocked, l suppose its horses for courses.
[quote][p][bold]Russ13[/bold] wrote: The front door wasn't double locked on both occasions???? Seriously!!! Now I'm not saying Irvin deserves this to happen to him but quite frankly if you've had one car stolen where thieves have gained access via a door that wasn't properly secured surely you'd make sure the door was properly locked after? The police say "Don't give them an easy ride", by not securing your property properly you may as well leave the keys in the ignition! I know insurance companies have stopped paying out if the keys have been stolen without forcing entry to the house i.e. "fished" out via the letterbox where they've been left in view/reach of the front door under the reason you must take reasonable precautions to secure the vehicle and the vehicle's keys. I'm pretty sure it could be argued that not double locking the front door isn't taking reasonable precautions, especially the second time it happened![/p][/quote]Hang on a minute, l might be old and naïve, but if you are downstairs in your own property, why should you double lock your doors, think of a fire escape with the doors double locked. Anyway up here we go out and leave our doors unlocked, l suppose its horses for courses. The Macduffian
  • Score: 9

1:40pm Sun 12 Jan 14

Lesley says...

Don't leave your car keys in the lobby.
Don't leave your car keys in the lobby. Lesley
  • Score: 7

1:22pm Mon 13 Jan 14

EthanEdwards says...

I'm voting stop putting your expensive cars on display and start locking them up in the Garage. Oh and lock your house properly.

It's the careless people like you that help to put up insurance for everyone else in the area. We don't have an especially bad crime problem in that area (I know it pretty well) merely a show off who is also a bit of a clot problem.
I'm voting stop putting your expensive cars on display and start locking them up in the Garage. Oh and lock your house properly. It's the careless people like you that help to put up insurance for everyone else in the area. We don't have an especially bad crime problem in that area (I know it pretty well) merely a show off who is also a bit of a clot problem. EthanEdwards
  • Score: 0

6:49am Tue 14 Jan 14

Nowthatsworthknowing says...

Russ13 wrote:
The front door wasn't double locked on both occasions???? Seriously!!!

Now I'm not saying Irvin deserves this to happen to him but quite frankly if you've had one car stolen where thieves have gained access via a door that wasn't properly secured surely you'd make sure the door was properly locked after?

The police say "Don't give them an easy ride", by not securing your property properly you may as well leave the keys in the ignition!

I know insurance companies have stopped paying out if the keys have been stolen without forcing entry to the house i.e. "fished" out via the letterbox where they've been left in view/reach of the front door under the reason you must take reasonable precautions to secure the vehicle and the vehicle's keys. I'm pretty sure it could be argued that not double locking the front door isn't taking reasonable precautions, especially the second time it happened!
Insurance Job ?
[quote][p][bold]Russ13[/bold] wrote: The front door wasn't double locked on both occasions???? Seriously!!! Now I'm not saying Irvin deserves this to happen to him but quite frankly if you've had one car stolen where thieves have gained access via a door that wasn't properly secured surely you'd make sure the door was properly locked after? The police say "Don't give them an easy ride", by not securing your property properly you may as well leave the keys in the ignition! I know insurance companies have stopped paying out if the keys have been stolen without forcing entry to the house i.e. "fished" out via the letterbox where they've been left in view/reach of the front door under the reason you must take reasonable precautions to secure the vehicle and the vehicle's keys. I'm pretty sure it could be argued that not double locking the front door isn't taking reasonable precautions, especially the second time it happened![/p][/quote]Insurance Job ? Nowthatsworthknowing
  • Score: -1

10:30pm Tue 14 Jan 14

nick91 says...

Nowthatsworthknowing wrote:
Russ13 wrote:
The front door wasn't double locked on both occasions???? Seriously!!!

Now I'm not saying Irvin deserves this to happen to him but quite frankly if you've had one car stolen where thieves have gained access via a door that wasn't properly secured surely you'd make sure the door was properly locked after?

The police say "Don't give them an easy ride", by not securing your property properly you may as well leave the keys in the ignition!

I know insurance companies have stopped paying out if the keys have been stolen without forcing entry to the house i.e. "fished" out via the letterbox where they've been left in view/reach of the front door under the reason you must take reasonable precautions to secure the vehicle and the vehicle's keys. I'm pretty sure it could be argued that not double locking the front door isn't taking reasonable precautions, especially the second time it happened!
Insurance Job ?
For those saying "insurance job"; you couldn't be further from the truth. We are a hard working family, and like the article says, we saved up a lot of money for a long time to get this car. If you have nothing more constructive to do than be cynical and judge us then please don't bother commenting at all. Incidents like these put people at risk in their own homes, cause distress and huge inconvenience.

For those wondering why the door wasn't double locked; we were still awake and sitting in the lounge when they broke in. We used to make a habit of double locking the door when we went to bed, which is why it wasn't double locked. The door is now double locked 24/7 no matter if we are in or out - even if it does go against fire safety instructions.

We have also been told different things by different members of the police. Some say leave your keys in a fairly obvious position in order to avoid confrontation with burglars. Others say to hide them because they will only quickly skim your house. So we don't know where to leave them to be honest.

For the person complaining that we are raising insurance premium rates; between family and friends, we now know of around 20 cars that have been stolen from the area since the beginning of the summer, so we are not the only people "forcing your premium up". I have lived here my whole life, so I know the area more than pretty well. Are you really that ignorant to think that we are careless and invite burglars into our house. Our garage won't house any of the cars, hence why we keep them on the next safest option: the driveway. Is this country so backwards now that you cannot work hard to buy yourself a new car (or as you graciously put it) show off. I wouldn't wish this upon anyone, but if you were to have people force entry into your family home, let alone steal cars from your driveway, then I think you may feel differently and start calling the sick people who commit the crimes the problem rather than the innocent, hard-working people like us.

The whole idea of this article (which actually really hasn't been put across by the writer) was to:

1) Make people in the area aware of what is going, so that they are even more cautious when it comes to home security and don't suffer the same problems we have.

2) Show the car so that on the slim chance that it is still somewhere near the area, someone may spot it and report it.
[quote][p][bold]Nowthatsworthknowing[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Russ13[/bold] wrote: The front door wasn't double locked on both occasions???? Seriously!!! Now I'm not saying Irvin deserves this to happen to him but quite frankly if you've had one car stolen where thieves have gained access via a door that wasn't properly secured surely you'd make sure the door was properly locked after? The police say "Don't give them an easy ride", by not securing your property properly you may as well leave the keys in the ignition! I know insurance companies have stopped paying out if the keys have been stolen without forcing entry to the house i.e. "fished" out via the letterbox where they've been left in view/reach of the front door under the reason you must take reasonable precautions to secure the vehicle and the vehicle's keys. I'm pretty sure it could be argued that not double locking the front door isn't taking reasonable precautions, especially the second time it happened![/p][/quote]Insurance Job ?[/p][/quote]For those saying "insurance job"; you couldn't be further from the truth. We are a hard working family, and like the article says, we saved up a lot of money for a long time to get this car. If you have nothing more constructive to do than be cynical and judge us then please don't bother commenting at all. Incidents like these put people at risk in their own homes, cause distress and huge inconvenience. For those wondering why the door wasn't double locked; we were still awake and sitting in the lounge when they broke in. We used to make a habit of double locking the door when we went to bed, which is why it wasn't double locked. The door is now double locked 24/7 no matter if we are in or out - even if it does go against fire safety instructions. We have also been told different things by different members of the police. Some say leave your keys in a fairly obvious position in order to avoid confrontation with burglars. Others say to hide them because they will only quickly skim your house. So we don't know where to leave them to be honest. For the person complaining that we are raising insurance premium rates; between family and friends, we now know of around 20 cars that have been stolen from the area since the beginning of the summer, so we are not the only people "forcing your premium up". I have lived here my whole life, so I know the area more than pretty well. Are you really that ignorant to think that we are careless and invite burglars into our house. Our garage won't house any of the cars, hence why we keep them on the next safest option: the driveway. Is this country so backwards now that you cannot work hard to buy yourself a new car (or as you graciously put it) show off. I wouldn't wish this upon anyone, but if you were to have people force entry into your family home, let alone steal cars from your driveway, then I think you may feel differently and start calling the sick people who commit the crimes the problem rather than the innocent, hard-working people like us. The whole idea of this article (which actually really hasn't been put across by the writer) was to: 1) Make people in the area aware of what is going, so that they are even more cautious when it comes to home security and don't suffer the same problems we have. 2) Show the car so that on the slim chance that it is still somewhere near the area, someone may spot it and report it. nick91
  • Score: 2

10:30am Wed 15 Jan 14

Nowthatsworthknowing says...

nick91 wrote:
Nowthatsworthknowing wrote:
Russ13 wrote:
The front door wasn't double locked on both occasions???? Seriously!!!

Now I'm not saying Irvin deserves this to happen to him but quite frankly if you've had one car stolen where thieves have gained access via a door that wasn't properly secured surely you'd make sure the door was properly locked after?

The police say "Don't give them an easy ride", by not securing your property properly you may as well leave the keys in the ignition!

I know insurance companies have stopped paying out if the keys have been stolen without forcing entry to the house i.e. "fished" out via the letterbox where they've been left in view/reach of the front door under the reason you must take reasonable precautions to secure the vehicle and the vehicle's keys. I'm pretty sure it could be argued that not double locking the front door isn't taking reasonable precautions, especially the second time it happened!
Insurance Job ?
For those saying "insurance job"; you couldn't be further from the truth. We are a hard working family, and like the article says, we saved up a lot of money for a long time to get this car. If you have nothing more constructive to do than be cynical and judge us then please don't bother commenting at all. Incidents like these put people at risk in their own homes, cause distress and huge inconvenience.

For those wondering why the door wasn't double locked; we were still awake and sitting in the lounge when they broke in. We used to make a habit of double locking the door when we went to bed, which is why it wasn't double locked. The door is now double locked 24/7 no matter if we are in or out - even if it does go against fire safety instructions.

We have also been told different things by different members of the police. Some say leave your keys in a fairly obvious position in order to avoid confrontation with burglars. Others say to hide them because they will only quickly skim your house. So we don't know where to leave them to be honest.

For the person complaining that we are raising insurance premium rates; between family and friends, we now know of around 20 cars that have been stolen from the area since the beginning of the summer, so we are not the only people "forcing your premium up". I have lived here my whole life, so I know the area more than pretty well. Are you really that ignorant to think that we are careless and invite burglars into our house. Our garage won't house any of the cars, hence why we keep them on the next safest option: the driveway. Is this country so backwards now that you cannot work hard to buy yourself a new car (or as you graciously put it) show off. I wouldn't wish this upon anyone, but if you were to have people force entry into your family home, let alone steal cars from your driveway, then I think you may feel differently and start calling the sick people who commit the crimes the problem rather than the innocent, hard-working people like us.

The whole idea of this article (which actually really hasn't been put across by the writer) was to:

1) Make people in the area aware of what is going, so that they are even more cautious when it comes to home security and don't suffer the same problems we have.

2) Show the car so that on the slim chance that it is still somewhere near the area, someone may spot it and report it.
1) Double Lock thy Front DOOR
2) Keep valuable items away fro prying Eyes
3) Dont be surprised by annoying comments, if your dumb enough not to adhere to points 1 & 2
[quote][p][bold]nick91[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Nowthatsworthknowing[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Russ13[/bold] wrote: The front door wasn't double locked on both occasions???? Seriously!!! Now I'm not saying Irvin deserves this to happen to him but quite frankly if you've had one car stolen where thieves have gained access via a door that wasn't properly secured surely you'd make sure the door was properly locked after? The police say "Don't give them an easy ride", by not securing your property properly you may as well leave the keys in the ignition! I know insurance companies have stopped paying out if the keys have been stolen without forcing entry to the house i.e. "fished" out via the letterbox where they've been left in view/reach of the front door under the reason you must take reasonable precautions to secure the vehicle and the vehicle's keys. I'm pretty sure it could be argued that not double locking the front door isn't taking reasonable precautions, especially the second time it happened![/p][/quote]Insurance Job ?[/p][/quote]For those saying "insurance job"; you couldn't be further from the truth. We are a hard working family, and like the article says, we saved up a lot of money for a long time to get this car. If you have nothing more constructive to do than be cynical and judge us then please don't bother commenting at all. Incidents like these put people at risk in their own homes, cause distress and huge inconvenience. For those wondering why the door wasn't double locked; we were still awake and sitting in the lounge when they broke in. We used to make a habit of double locking the door when we went to bed, which is why it wasn't double locked. The door is now double locked 24/7 no matter if we are in or out - even if it does go against fire safety instructions. We have also been told different things by different members of the police. Some say leave your keys in a fairly obvious position in order to avoid confrontation with burglars. Others say to hide them because they will only quickly skim your house. So we don't know where to leave them to be honest. For the person complaining that we are raising insurance premium rates; between family and friends, we now know of around 20 cars that have been stolen from the area since the beginning of the summer, so we are not the only people "forcing your premium up". I have lived here my whole life, so I know the area more than pretty well. Are you really that ignorant to think that we are careless and invite burglars into our house. Our garage won't house any of the cars, hence why we keep them on the next safest option: the driveway. Is this country so backwards now that you cannot work hard to buy yourself a new car (or as you graciously put it) show off. I wouldn't wish this upon anyone, but if you were to have people force entry into your family home, let alone steal cars from your driveway, then I think you may feel differently and start calling the sick people who commit the crimes the problem rather than the innocent, hard-working people like us. The whole idea of this article (which actually really hasn't been put across by the writer) was to: 1) Make people in the area aware of what is going, so that they are even more cautious when it comes to home security and don't suffer the same problems we have. 2) Show the car so that on the slim chance that it is still somewhere near the area, someone may spot it and report it.[/p][/quote]1) Double Lock thy Front DOOR 2) Keep valuable items away fro prying Eyes 3) Dont be surprised by annoying comments, if your dumb enough not to adhere to points 1 & 2 Nowthatsworthknowing
  • Score: -1

12:29pm Wed 15 Jan 14

nick91 says...

Nowthatsworthknowing wrote:
nick91 wrote:
Nowthatsworthknowing wrote:
Russ13 wrote: The front door wasn't double locked on both occasions???? Seriously!!! Now I'm not saying Irvin deserves this to happen to him but quite frankly if you've had one car stolen where thieves have gained access via a door that wasn't properly secured surely you'd make sure the door was properly locked after? The police say "Don't give them an easy ride", by not securing your property properly you may as well leave the keys in the ignition! I know insurance companies have stopped paying out if the keys have been stolen without forcing entry to the house i.e. "fished" out via the letterbox where they've been left in view/reach of the front door under the reason you must take reasonable precautions to secure the vehicle and the vehicle's keys. I'm pretty sure it could be argued that not double locking the front door isn't taking reasonable precautions, especially the second time it happened!
Insurance Job ?
For those saying "insurance job"; you couldn't be further from the truth. We are a hard working family, and like the article says, we saved up a lot of money for a long time to get this car. If you have nothing more constructive to do than be cynical and judge us then please don't bother commenting at all. Incidents like these put people at risk in their own homes, cause distress and huge inconvenience. For those wondering why the door wasn't double locked; we were still awake and sitting in the lounge when they broke in. We used to make a habit of double locking the door when we went to bed, which is why it wasn't double locked. The door is now double locked 24/7 no matter if we are in or out - even if it does go against fire safety instructions. We have also been told different things by different members of the police. Some say leave your keys in a fairly obvious position in order to avoid confrontation with burglars. Others say to hide them because they will only quickly skim your house. So we don't know where to leave them to be honest. For the person complaining that we are raising insurance premium rates; between family and friends, we now know of around 20 cars that have been stolen from the area since the beginning of the summer, so we are not the only people "forcing your premium up". I have lived here my whole life, so I know the area more than pretty well. Are you really that ignorant to think that we are careless and invite burglars into our house. Our garage won't house any of the cars, hence why we keep them on the next safest option: the driveway. Is this country so backwards now that you cannot work hard to buy yourself a new car (or as you graciously put it) show off. I wouldn't wish this upon anyone, but if you were to have people force entry into your family home, let alone steal cars from your driveway, then I think you may feel differently and start calling the sick people who commit the crimes the problem rather than the innocent, hard-working people like us. The whole idea of this article (which actually really hasn't been put across by the writer) was to: 1) Make people in the area aware of what is going, so that they are even more cautious when it comes to home security and don't suffer the same problems we have. 2) Show the car so that on the slim chance that it is still somewhere near the area, someone may spot it and report it.
1) Double Lock thy Front DOOR 2) Keep valuable items away fro prying Eyes 3) Dont be surprised by annoying comments, if your dumb enough not to adhere to points 1 & 2
1. I've said what I need to say on that point.
2. On the first occasion the keys were in the kitchen - the other side of the house to the front door. On the second occasion they were in the hallway, but impossible to see from outside as they were tucked around the corner. Neither times could you see the keys from outside the house at all.

My point is you should refrain from posting negative comments towards a situation that has caused distress to us. Maybe we could have spent hundreds and more on cctv, driveway safety equipment and alarms etc. but aren't the people to blame the sick people who are committing these pre-determined crimes, not the victims of them?
[quote][p][bold]Nowthatsworthknowing[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]nick91[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Nowthatsworthknowing[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Russ13[/bold] wrote: The front door wasn't double locked on both occasions???? Seriously!!! Now I'm not saying Irvin deserves this to happen to him but quite frankly if you've had one car stolen where thieves have gained access via a door that wasn't properly secured surely you'd make sure the door was properly locked after? The police say "Don't give them an easy ride", by not securing your property properly you may as well leave the keys in the ignition! I know insurance companies have stopped paying out if the keys have been stolen without forcing entry to the house i.e. "fished" out via the letterbox where they've been left in view/reach of the front door under the reason you must take reasonable precautions to secure the vehicle and the vehicle's keys. I'm pretty sure it could be argued that not double locking the front door isn't taking reasonable precautions, especially the second time it happened![/p][/quote]Insurance Job ?[/p][/quote]For those saying "insurance job"; you couldn't be further from the truth. We are a hard working family, and like the article says, we saved up a lot of money for a long time to get this car. If you have nothing more constructive to do than be cynical and judge us then please don't bother commenting at all. Incidents like these put people at risk in their own homes, cause distress and huge inconvenience. For those wondering why the door wasn't double locked; we were still awake and sitting in the lounge when they broke in. We used to make a habit of double locking the door when we went to bed, which is why it wasn't double locked. The door is now double locked 24/7 no matter if we are in or out - even if it does go against fire safety instructions. We have also been told different things by different members of the police. Some say leave your keys in a fairly obvious position in order to avoid confrontation with burglars. Others say to hide them because they will only quickly skim your house. So we don't know where to leave them to be honest. For the person complaining that we are raising insurance premium rates; between family and friends, we now know of around 20 cars that have been stolen from the area since the beginning of the summer, so we are not the only people "forcing your premium up". I have lived here my whole life, so I know the area more than pretty well. Are you really that ignorant to think that we are careless and invite burglars into our house. Our garage won't house any of the cars, hence why we keep them on the next safest option: the driveway. Is this country so backwards now that you cannot work hard to buy yourself a new car (or as you graciously put it) show off. I wouldn't wish this upon anyone, but if you were to have people force entry into your family home, let alone steal cars from your driveway, then I think you may feel differently and start calling the sick people who commit the crimes the problem rather than the innocent, hard-working people like us. The whole idea of this article (which actually really hasn't been put across by the writer) was to: 1) Make people in the area aware of what is going, so that they are even more cautious when it comes to home security and don't suffer the same problems we have. 2) Show the car so that on the slim chance that it is still somewhere near the area, someone may spot it and report it.[/p][/quote]1) Double Lock thy Front DOOR 2) Keep valuable items away fro prying Eyes 3) Dont be surprised by annoying comments, if your dumb enough not to adhere to points 1 & 2[/p][/quote]1. I've said what I need to say on that point. 2. On the first occasion the keys were in the kitchen - the other side of the house to the front door. On the second occasion they were in the hallway, but impossible to see from outside as they were tucked around the corner. Neither times could you see the keys from outside the house at all. My point is you should refrain from posting negative comments towards a situation that has caused distress to us. Maybe we could have spent hundreds and more on cctv, driveway safety equipment and alarms etc. but aren't the people to blame the sick people who are committing these pre-determined crimes, not the victims of them? nick91
  • Score: 0

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